4 Dec 2017

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Book Review / City of Saviors by Rachel Howzell Hall


Los Angeles Homicide Detective Elouise Norton encounters her toughest case yet in City of Saviors, the fourth installment in the critically acclaimed mystery series from author Rachel Howzell Hall.

After a long Labor Day weekend, seventy-three-year-old Eugene Washington is found dead in his Leimert Park home. At first blush, his death seems unremarkable―heatwave combined with food poisoning from a holiday barbecue. But something in the way Washington died doesn’t make sense. LAPD Homicide Detective Elouise "Lou" Norton is called to investigate the death and learns that the only family Washington had was the 6,000-member congregation of Blessed Mission Ministries, led by Bishop Solomon Tate.

But something wicked is lurking among the congregants of this church.

Lou’s partner, Detective Colin Taggert, thinks her focus on the congregation comes from her distrust of organized religion. But Lou is convinced that the murderer is sitting in one of those red velvet pews―and that Bishop Tate may be protecting the wolf in the flock. Lou must force the truth into the light and confront her own demons in order to save another soul before it’s too late.


Published:     8th August 2017
Publisher:  Titan Books
Goodreads :  Click here
Series or Stand-Alone:  Book 4, Detective Elouise Norton
Source:  Review Copy from Publisher



MY REVIEW

What I liked about this story...   Although it might help to start from the beginning of the series, you don't have to.  The best part of this story for me was the investigation.  Following Detective Elouise Norton trying to discover what was going on was by far the best part for me, with a whole range of characters who could be the killer.  There was also a very surprising twist in this story that I had not expected.

What I didn't like about this story...   Apart from the surprising twist near the end of the story, this was very predictable read for me, which I have to be honest and say that it was a bit disappointing as the one thing I enjoy about these type of stories is the unknown, not knowing what is around the corner. 







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